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Vesti la Giubba from "Pagliacci"

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Ruggiero Leoncavallo

Ruggiero Leoncavallo (tr. Johnson)


General Info

Year: 1892 / 2015
Duration: c. 3:10
Difficulty: III(see Ratings for explanation)
Publisher: Manuscript


Instrumentation

Full Score
Solo Tenor
C Piccolo
Flute I-II
Oboe I-II
English Horn
Bassoon I-II
Contra-Bassoon
E-flat Clarinet
B-flat Soprano Clarinet I-II-III
E-flat Alto Clarinet
B-flat Bass Clarinet
B-flat Contrabass Clarinet
B-flat Soprano Saxophone
E-flat Alto Saxophone I-II
B-flat Tenor Saxophone
E-flat Baritone Saxophone
B-flat Trumpet I-II-III
Horn in F I-II-III-IV
Trombone Solo-I-II
Euphonium (Bass Clef & Treble Clef)
Tuba
String Bass
Piano
Timpani
Percussion, including:

  • Crash Cymbals


Errata

None discovered thus far.


Program Notes

""Vesti la giubba"" ("Put on the costume", sometimes translated as "On With the Motley") is a famous tenor aria from Ruggero Leoncavallo's 1892 opera Pagliacci. Vesti la giubba is sung at the conclusion of the first act, when Canio discovers his wife's infidelity, but must nevertheless prepare for his performance as Pagliaccio the clown because "the show must go on". The aria is often regarded as one of the most moving in the operatic repertoire of the time. The pain of Canio is portrayed in the aria and exemplifies the entire notion of the "tragic clown": smiling on the outside but crying on the inside. This is still displayed today, as the clown motif often features the painted-on tear running down the cheek of the performer. According to the Guinness Book of Records, this aria sung by Enrico Caruso, first recorded in November 1902, was the first million-selling record in history.

-Program Note from Wikipedia


Commercial Discography

None discovered thus far.


State Ratings

None discovered thus far.


Performances

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Works for Winds by this Composer


References