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Sinfonia Hungarica (Van der Roost)

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Jan Van der Roost

Jan Van der Roost


General Info

Year: 2000
Duration: c. 38:32
Difficulty: (see Ratings for explanation)
Publisher: De Haske
Cost: Score and Parts - €635.50   |   Score only - €17.75

Each individual movement is also sold separately.


Movements

1. Attila! - 12:45
2. Árpád - 11:14
3. István - 14:33


Instrumentation

Full Score
Piccolo
Flute I-II
Oboe I-II
English Horn
Bassoons I-II
Contrabassoon (optional)
E-flat Clarinet
B-flat Clarinet I-II-III
E-flat Alto Clarinet
B-flat Bass Clarinet
B-flat Contrabass Clarinet
B-flat Soprano Saxophone
E-flat Alto Saxophone I-II
B-flat Tenor Saxophone
E-flat Baritone Saxophone
B-flat Trumpet I-II-III
Horn in F I-II-III-IV
Trombone I-II-III
Euphonium I-II
Tuba (div.)
String Bass
Harp
Piano
Timpani
Percussion, including:

  • Anvils (as many as possible)
  • Bass Drum
  • Beatring
  • Chinese Cymbal
  • Crash Cymbal
  • Crotales
  • Field Drum
  • Finger Cymbal
  • Flaxatone
  • Floor Tom
  • Glockenspiel
  • Low Tom
  • Snare Drum
  • Suspended Cymbal (2)
  • Tambourine
  • Tam-tam (2)
  • Tom-toms (4)
  • Triangle (2)
  • Tubular Bells
  • Vibraphone
  • Whip
  • Wind Chime
  • Wind Machine
  • Xylophone

Players shouting


Program Notes

This three-movement symphony musically depicts the history of Hungary. Key historical figures, wars and other important events from this country inspired all three movements. The first movement depicts Atilla, the King of the Huns, and is characterised by fear, threat and aggression. The second movement focuses on Árpád, the founder of the Hungarian state, and the final movement is named after István, the king who introduced Christianity into Hungary.

The beautiful theme of the national hymn appears throughout the symphony; however it is often partially hidden. It is used as a “thread,” hardly recognizable at the beginning, becoming more and more obvious near the end, and it concludes the symphony as the “final apotheosis,” making the band sound like a majestic living organ.

-Program Note from publisher


Media


State Ratings

None discovered thus far.


Performances

To submit a performance please join The Wind Repertory Project

  • Kaohsiung City (Taiwan) Wind Orchestra (Jan Van der Roost, conductor) - 20 July 2019
  • Musée d'Art Harmonie (Tokyo, Japan) (Hiroyuki Nogami, conductor) - 11 May 2019
  • Masters Brass Nagoya (Japan) (Tatsuya Suzuki, conductor) - 30 April 2018
  • University of North Carolina Greensboro Wind Ensemble (John R. Locke, conductor) - 14 February 2003


Works for Winds by This Composer


Resources