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Shenandoah

From Wind Repertory Project
This work has been identified for inclusion in the Small Band Repertoire Initiative. You may find discussion of the work's challenges and merits under the Discussion tab above. You may also contribute your own thoughts and recommendations by joining the WRP.


Frank Ticheli

Frank Ticheli


General Info

Year: 1999
Duration: c. 6:10
Difficulty: IV (see Ratings for explanation)
Publisher: Manhattan Beach Music
Cost: Score and Parts - $95.00   |   Score Only - $15.00

For additional availability information, see Discussion tab, above.


Instrumentation

Full Score
Flute I-II
Oboe I-II
Bassoon I-II
Bb Soprano Clarinet I-II-III
Bb Bass Clarinet
Eb Contra Alto Clarinet
Alto Saxophone I-II
Tenor Saxophone
Baritone Saxophone
Bb Trumpet I-II-III
Horn in F I-II
Trombone I-II-III
Euphonium
Tuba
String Bass
Timpani
Percussion I-II, including:

  • Bass Drum
  • Cymbal (suspended)
  • Triangle
  • Tubular Bells (Chimes)
  • Vibraphone


Errata

None discovered thus far.


Program Notes

The Shenandoah Valley and the Shenandoah River are located in Virginia. The origin of the name for this river and valley is obscure. The origins of the folk song are equally obscure, but all date to the 19th century. Many variants on the melody and text have been handed down through the years with the most popular telling the story of an early settler’s love for a Native American woman. The composer writes:

In my setting of Shenandoah I was inspired by the freedom and beauty of the folk melody and by the natural images evoked by the words, especially the image of a river. I was less concerned with the sound of a rolling river than with its life-affirming energy -- its timelessness. Sometimes the accompaniment flows quietly under the melody; other times it breathes alongside it. The work's mood ranges from quiet reflection, through growing optimism, to profound exaltation.

- Program Note by Frank Ticheli


The Shenandoah River and the valley that bears its name are located in Virginia. It is claimed that the river and valley were named in the 1750s by the Cherokee as a friendly tribute to a visiting Iroquois chief named Shenandoah.

The origins of the haunting folk song named for this valley are obscure, and lyrics offer a variety of stories. Some tell of a roving trader in love with the daughter of an Indian chief. In this interpretation, the rover tells the chief of his intent to take the girl with him far to the West, across the Missouri River. Other interpretations tell of a pioneer’s nostalgia for the valley in Virginia, and still others describe a Confederate soldier in the American Civil War dreaming of his home in Virginia.

This setting for concert band was commissioned by Hill Country (Texas) Middle School Symphonic Band, Cheryl Floyd, conductor, as a tribute to Jonathan Paul Cosentino, a horn player in the Hill Country band whose young life ended tragically in December of 1997.

- Program Note by the Austin (Texas) Symphonic Band concert program, 7 February 2015


The Shenandoah Valley and the Shenandoah River are located in Virginia. There is disagreement among historians concerning the origins of their names. Some claim that the river and valley were named in the 1750’s by the Cherokee as a friendly tribute to a visiting Iroquois Chief named Skenandoah. Others suggest that the region was named not by the Cherokee, but by the Senedo Indians of the Virginia Valley. In the Senedo tradition, Shenandoah means “daughter of the moon”, and bears no relation to the Iroquois Chief Skenandoah.

The origins of the folk song are equally obscure, but all date to the 19th century. It has been attributed variously to a coal miner in Pennsylvania, a young protégé of Stephen Foster, and to a housewife in Lexington, Kentucky. Many variants on the melody and text have been handed down through the years, the most popular telling the story of an early settler’s love for a Native American woman.

- Program Note from State University of New York, Potsdam, Symphonic Band concert program, 17 November 2016


Commercial Discography


Audio Links


State Ratings

  • Florida: IV
  • Maryland: IV
  • Minnesota: II


Performances

To submit a performance please join The Wind Repertory Project

  • Indiana University (Bloomington) Concert Band (Jason H. Nam, conductor) – 19 November 2019
  • Heisey Wind Ensemble (Newark, Ohio) (Russel C. Mikkelson, conductor) – 27 October 2019
  • Eastern Shore Wind Ensemble (Chestertown, Md.) (Charles Thai, conductor) – 3 November 2019
  • Watsonville (Calif.) Community Band (Eugene Smith, conductor) – 8 June 2018 (Golden Gate Park, San Francisco)
  • Empire Wind Ensemble (Highland, Calif.) (Jessica Swanson, conductor) – 12 June 2019
  • Pacific Coast Wind Ensemble (Florence, Ore.) (David Olson, conductor) – 4 May 2019
  • Kent State (Ohio) Communiversity Band (Mason Smith, conductor) – 30 April 2019
  • Cincinnati (Ohio) Youth Symphonic Band (Adelaide Young, conductor) – 29 April 2019
  • Valdosta (Ga.) State University Concert Band (Benjamin Harper, conductor) – 24 April 2019
  • Muhlenberg College (Allentown, Penn.) Wind Ensemble (Andrew Ardizzoia, conductor) – 7 April 2019
  • Fresno (Calif.) City College Wind Ensemble (Elisha K Wilson, conductor) - 17 March 2019 (2019 Sutherland Wind Festival (Fresno, Calif.)
  • Colorado State University (Fort Collins) Symphonic Band (Hollie Bennett, graduate student conductor) – 4 March 2019
  • Michigan State University (East Lansing) Campus Band (Arris Golden, conductor) – 19 February 2019
  • Colorado State University, Pueblo, Festival of Winds Green Wind Orchestra (Timothy Diem, conductor) - 16 February 2019
  • Appalachian State University (Boone, N.C.) Wind Ensemble (Donald Peach, conductor) – 15 February 2019
  • Tallahassee (Fla.) Winds (Patrick Dunnigan, conductor) – 12 February 2019
  • University of Miami (Coral Gables) Green Concert Band (Jay C. Reese, conductor) – 2 February 2019
  • Mid-State (Aitkin, Minn.) Conference 11th-12th Grade Honor Band (Betsy McCann, conductor) – 8 December 2018
  • Ripon (Wisc.) College Symphonic Wind Ensemble (Kurt Dietrich, conductor) – 18 November 2018
  • Black Canyon Chamber Winds (Phoenix, Ariz.) (Frank Dubuy, conductor) - 13 November 2018
  • University of West Georgia (Carrollton) Wind Ensemble (Josh Byrd, conductor) - 22 November 2018


Works for Winds by this Composer


Resources