Please DONATE to help with maintenance and upkeep of the Wind Repertory Project!

Scottish Rhapsody, A

From Wind Repertory Project
Clare Grundman

Clare Grundman


General Info

Year: 1981
Duration: c. 6:00
Difficulty: IV (see Ratings for explanation)
Publisher: Boosey and Hawkes
Cost: Score and Parts - $80.00   |   Score Only - $11.95


Instrumentation

Full Score
Flute I-II
Piccolo
Oboe I-II
Bassoon I-II
Eb Clarinet
Bb Clarinet I-II-III
Eb Alto Clarinet
Bb Bass Clarinet
Bb Contrabass Clarinet
Eb Alto Saxophone I-II
Bb Tenor Saxophone
Eb Baritone Saxophone
Bb Cornet I-II-III
Bb Trumpet I-II
Horn in F I-II-III-IV
Trombone I-II-III
Euphonium
Basses
String Bass
Timpani
Percussion, including:

  • Bass Drum
  • Chimes
  • Cymbals (crash and suspended)
  • Glockenspiel (Bells)
  • Snare Drum
  • Triangle
  • Xylophone


Errata

None discovered thus far.


Program Notes

Scotland is a land of contrast, from the sweeping hills of the Lowlands, and the densely populated industrial Midlands, to the mountains and glens of the north, and the craggy sparseness of the outer isles. Scotland's musical heritage is no less varied and colorful. The Scot has been described as "a creature of extremes - his sadness is despair, his joy is rapture" and Scotland's turbulent history only serves to accentuate these characteristics.

Clare Grundman's Scottish Rhapsody brings together some of Scotland's internationally known songs, such as Auld Lang Syne, Scotland the Brave, and The Bluebells of Scotland, while others -- An Eriskay Love Lilt and The Cockle Gatherer -- so well known and loved in Scotland are not that familiar to foreign ears, and rightly deserve wider recognition. Both these songs are Hebridean in origin, and are contained in the Kennedy-Fraser collection, Songs of the Hebrides.

The beautifully lyrical love song An Eriskay Love Lilt contrasts sharply with the militant tones of Scotland the Brave. The Scottish Rebellion of 1745 led by Prince Charles Edward Stuart ('Bonnie Prince Charlie') ended brutally on the battlefield of Culloden, and the Prince had to flee for his life. He escaped in a boat to Skye. This event is recalled in the poignantly lovely Skye Boat Song. The haunting lament, Will Ye No Come Back Again? is also addressed to Bonnie Prince Charlie who, incidentally, was never able to return to Scotland.

Scottish Rhapsody typifies the loves and woes, the joys and longings, presented in so many Scottish songs. It is a most appropriate musical portrait of Scotland.

- Program Note from Score


State Ratings

  • Florida: IV   ---  (The Florida Bandmasters Association denotes this as "significant literature.")


Performances

To submit a performance please join The Wind Repertory Project

  • Radford University (Radford, Va.) Symphony Band (R. Wayne Gallops, conductor) - 15 November 2017


Works for Winds by this Composer


Resources

  • Grundman, C. (1981). A Scottish Rhapsody [score]. Boosey & Hawkes: [New York].