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Rhapsody on the Minstrel Boy

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Robert Farnon

Traditional, arranged by Robert Farnon


General Info

Year: 1984
Duration: c. 3:40
Difficulty: III-1/2 (see Ratings for explanation)
Original Medium: Folk Song
Publisher: G. & M. Brand
Cost: Score and Parts (print) - $70.00   |   Score Only (print) - $13.00

For further availability information, see Discussion tab, above.


Instrumentation

Full Score
Flute I-II (Piccolo)
Oboe I-II
Bassoon I-II
B-flat Soprano Clarinet I-II-III
E-flat Alto Clarinet
B-flat Bass Clarinet
E-flat Alto Saxophone I-II
B-flat Tenor Saxophone
E-flat Baritone Saxophone
B-flat Cornet I-II-III
B-flat Trumpet I-II
Horn in F I-II-III-IV
Trombone I-II-III
Euphonium
Tuba (String Bass)
Piano
Timpani
Percussion, including:

  • Bass Drum
  • Crash Cymbals
  • Glockenspiel
  • Suspended Cymbal
  • Vibraphone


Errata

None discovered thus far.


Program Notes

The Minstrel Boy is an Irish patriotic song written by Thomas Moore (1779–1852) who set it to the melody of The Moreen, an old Irish air. It is widely believed that Moore composed the song in remembrance of a number of his friends, whom he met while studying at Trinity College, Dublin, and who had participated in (and were killed during) the Irish Rebellion of 1798. However this has never been definitively proved and the tune is also played by the British Army and Orange Order flute bands.

The song gained widespread popularity and became a favourite of many Irishmen who fought during the American Civil War and gained even more popularity after World War I. The song is notably associated with organisations that historically had a heavy representation of Irish-Americans, in particular the police and fire departments of New York, Boston and Chicago and those of various other major U.S. metropolitan areas, even after those organisations have ceased to have a substantial over-representation of personnel of Irish ancestry. The melody is frequently played, typically on bagpipes, at funerals of members and/or officers of such organisations who have died or been killed in service. Unsurprisingly, given its lyrics, it is also associated with the Irish Army and with traditionally Irish regiments in the armies of the United Kingdom and the United States as well as other armies of the world. It is Roud Folk Song Index no. 13867.

- Program Note from Wikipedia


Media


State Ratings

  • Arkansas: III
  • Louisiana: III
  • Mississippi: VI-A
  • Oklahoma: III-A
  • Texas: III. Complete
  • Virginia: IV


Performances

To submit a performance please join The Wind Repertory Project


Works for Winds by This Composer


Resources