Please DONATE to help with maintenance and upkeep of the Wind Repertory Project!

Pines of Rome (trans Duker)

From Wind Repertory Project
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Ottorino Respighi

Ottorino Respighi (trans. Duker)


This work may appear under its Italian title, Pini di Roma


General Info

Year: 1924 / 1974
Duration: c. 20:35
Difficulty: V (see Ratings for explanation)
Original Medium: Orchestra
Publisher: Ricordi/Hal Leonard
Cost: Score and Parts - $85.00   |   Score Only - $10.00


Movements

1. The Pines of Villa Borghese - 2:39
2. Pines Near a Catacomb - 6:20
3. The Pines of the Janiculum - 6:52
4. The Pines of the Appian Way - 5:05


Instrumentation

Full Score
C Piccolo/Flute I
Flute II
Oboe I-II
English Horn
Bassoon I-II
Contra-Bassoon
E-flat Clarinet
B-flat Soprano Clarinet I-II-III
B-flat Bass Clarinet
E-flat Contrabass Clarinet
B-flat Contrabass Clarinet
E-flat Alto Saxophone I-II
B-flat Tenor Saxophone
E-flat Baritone Saxophone
Cornets I-II-III
B-flat Trumpet I-II
Horn in F I-II-III-IV
Trombone I-II
Bass Trombone
Euphonium (Bass Clef & Treble Clef)
Tuba
String Bass
Piano
Organ
Celesta
Harp
Timpani
Percussion, including:

  • Bass Drum
  • Bells
  • Crash Cymbals
  • Ratchet
  • Tambourine
  • Tam-Tam
  • Triangle


Errata

None discovered thus far.


Program Notes

The Pines of Rome is Respighi's most notable and durably popular composition, and this transcription for band by Guy Duker has long been considered a staple in the literature. With its specific musical imagery and brilliant scoring, this is truly a magnificent and rewarding work for mature bands.

- Program Note by publisher


The Pines of Rome was written in 1924 and was performed first in Rome in 1925. The composition is in four parts: The Pines of the Villa Bourghese, The Pines Near a Catacomb, The Pines of the Janiculum, and The Pines of the Appian Way. It is based on the following program:

The children are at play in the pine-groves of the Villa Borghese, dancing the Italian equivalent of "Ring around a rosy;" mimicking marching solders and battles; twittering and shrieking like swallows at evening; and then disappearing. Suddenly the scene changes. We see shadows of the pines which overhang the entrance to a catacomb. From the depths rises a chant which reechoes solemnly, sonorously, like a hymn, and then is mysteriously silenced. There is a thrill in the air. The full moon reveals the profile of the pines of Giancolo's Hill. A nightingale sings. Now it is misty dawn on the Appian Way. The tragic countryside is guarded by solitary pines. Indistinctly, incessantly, the rhythm of innumerable steps is heard. To the poet's phantasy appears a vision of past glories; trumpets blare, and the army of the consul advances brilliantly in the grandeur of a newly risen sun toward the Sacred Way, mounting in triumph the Capitoline Hill.

This setting for symphonic band was done in 1966 by Guy Duker, assistant director of University of Illinois Bands since 1953.

- Program note by Harry Begian from Band Music Notes


The final section of the Pines of Rome is titled Pines of the Appian Way. Respighi gives the following colorful description of an ancient Roman army on the march: “Misty Dawn on the Appian Way. Solitary pines stand guard over the tragic countryside. We hear the faint unceasing rhythm of numberless steps. A vision of ancient glories appears to the poet, trumpets blare and a consular army erupts in the brilliance of the newly risen sun — towards the Sacred Way, mounting to a triumph on the Capitoline Hill.” The movement opens quietly, with a slow and inexorable march, but builds gradually towards an enormous brassy peak (with several brassy knolls along the way...). To create this picture of Roman military might, Respighi’s score calls for six bucinae—Roman war trumpets. He also provides the helpful suggestion that modern trumpets may be used if bucinae are not available!

- Program Note by William V. Johnson for the San Luis Obispo Wind Orchestra concert program, 15 May 2010


His symphonic poem The Pines of Rome was the second in a triptych of works paying tribute to The Eternal City. The piece’s first movement shows children playing outside the Villa Borghese, the opulent home of one of Rome’s most prominent 17th-century families. Pines Near a Catacomb depicts a solitary church in the middle of a Roman field dotted with pine trees, the section’s ominous melody building to a sweeping climax. In the third movement, Respighi paints a musical portrait of the Pines of the Janiculum at night. The Janiculum was one of Rome’s seven hills, so named because it was the site of temple of Janus, the Roman god of portals and the new year. In this section, Respighi specified the use of a gramophone recording of birdsong to capture the atmosphere perfectly. The work closes with a portrait of the pine tree-lined Appian Way, the military road of the Roman Republic. The Roman legions emerge from the mists, and the orchestra mirrors their approach, growing louder as the soldiers get closer to the Capitoline Hill. As the movement closes, the victorious warriors, led by the Republican Consul, arrive at the Capitol with the rising sun behind them, their glory reflected in the work’s jubilant closing pages. The Pines of Rome was, and continues to be, a great success and popular favorite, so much so that Respighi used the money he made from it to buy a villa, which he appropriately named “The Pines.”

- Program Note by John Mangum for the Los Angeles Philharmonic


The composer provided his own detailed notes for each of the four connected sections of The Pines of Rome:

1. The Pines of the Villa Borghese (Allegretto vivace, 2/8). Children are at play in the pine grove of the Villa Borghese, dancing the Italian equivalent of “Ring around a Rosy;” mimicking marching soldiers and battles; twittering and shrieking like swallows at evening; and they disappear. Suddenly the scene changes to—

2. The Pines Near a Catacomb (Lento, 4/4; muted horns, p). We see the shadow of the pines, which overhang the entrance of a catacomb. From the depths rises a chant, which re-echoes solemnly, like a hymn, and then is mysteriously silenced.

3. The Pines of the Janiculum (Lento, 4/4; piano cadenza; clarinet solo). There is a thrill in the air. The full moon reveals the profile of the pines of Gianicolo’s Hill. A nightingale sings.

4. The Pines of the Appian Way (Tempo di marcia). Misty dawn on the Appian Way. The tragic country is guarded by solitary pines. Indistinctly, incessantly, the rhythm of innumerable steps. To the poet’s fantasy appear s a vision of past glories; trumpets blare, and the army of the Consul advances brilliantly in the grandeur of a newly risen sun toward the Sacred Way, mounting in triumph the Capitoline Hill.

- Program Note by Richard Veit for the Baylor University Symphonic Band concert program, 14 October 2019


Commercial Discography


Audio Links


State Ratings

  • Alabama: Class AA
  • Arkansas: V
  • Florida: VI
  • Georgia: VI
  • Kansas: VI
  • Louisiana: V
  • Maryland: VI
  • Michigan: Senior High AA
  • Mississippi: VI-A
  • Oklahoma: V-A
  • Tennessee: VI
  • Texas: V. Complete
  • Virginia: VI


Performances

To submit a performance please join The Wind Repertory Project


Works for Winds by this Composer


References

  • Respighi, O.; Duker, G. (1974). The Pines of Rome [score]. Ricordi: [Milan].
  • Smith, Norman and Albert Stoutamire (1979) Band Music Notes. Rev. ed. San Diego: Kjos West, pp. 190-191
  • Smith, Norman E. (2002). Program Notes for Band. Chicago: GIA Publications, pp. 497.