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Midway March (arr Moss)

From Wind Repertory Project
John Williams

John Williams (arr. John Moss)


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General Info

Year: 1976 / 1994
Duration: c. 3:45
Difficulty: III (see Ratings for explanation)
Publisher: Hal Leonard
Cost: Score and Parts (print) - $60.00   |   Score Only (print) - $7.50


Instrumentation

Full Score
C Piccolo/Flute
Oboe
Bassoon
B-flat Soprano Clarinet I-II-III
E-flat Alto Clarinet
B-flat Bass Clarinet
E-flat Alto Saxophone I-II
B-flat Tenor Saxophone
E-flat Baritone Saxophone
B-flat Trumpet I-II-III
Horn in F I-II
Trombone I-II
Euphonium
Tuba
String Bass
Timpani
Percussion I-II-III

  • Bass Drum
  • Bells
  • Crash Cymbals
  • Snare Drum
  • Suspended Cymbal


Errata

None discovered thus far.


Program Notes

The movie Midway, released in 1976, was one of the last of the World War II epic films. The action settles on the Battle of Midway, and the main characters include well-known names from the time including Admiral Chester Nimitz and Japanese Admiral Isoroku Yamamoto, along with several fictional characters.

- Program Note from Heritage Encyclopedia of Band Music


The Battle of Midway was a victory that some say was the turning point of the U.S. war against Japan during World War II. The jaunty nature of the march celebrates the victory but omits the high cost of a battle. The victory was so important to American morale that the name found its way into the lexicon of the country. Chicago’s Midway Airport, for example, was named for the battle. Key to the victory was the breaking of the Japanese Naval encryption codes. The war had been going badly for the U.S. and the Japanese planned to deliver a devastating blow to finish off the U.S. fleet at Midway. However, due to the U.S. Signals intelligence breaking the Japanese encryption code, the U.S. was able to plan a counterattack that led to eventual victory, although with great loss of U.S. life.

Williams references the code in his march with a repetitive set of staccato notes in the brass. The march was composed in 1976 as part of the soundtrack for an epic movie. Despite its big-name cast, the movie was not a smashing success, but in June 1992 a more successful re-edit of the extended version aired on the CBS network commemorating the 50th anniversary of the Battle of Midway. Regardless of the success of the film, the score produced one of Williams’s most popular marches, Midway March.

- Program Note by the Austin (Texas) Symphonic Band concert program, 7 Feb 2015


Commercial Discography

None discovered thus far.


Media


State Ratings

  • Indiana: ISSMA SENIOR BAND GROUP II


Performances

To submit a performance please join The Wind Repertory Project

  • University of Texas (Austin) Longhorn Concert Band (Ryan Kelly, conductor) - 22 April 2018
  • Rowan University (Glassboro, N.J.) Concert Band (Joseph Higgins, conductor) – 28 April 2016
  • Elkhart Municipal Band (David Swihart, conductor) – 8 March 2015


Works for Winds by this Composer


Resources