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Loch Lomond (Adaptable Band)

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Frank Ticheli

Frank Ticheli (arr. Robert J. Ambrose)


Subtitle: For Flex Band or Flex Orchestra


General Info

Year:2002 / 2020
Duration: c. 6:25
Difficulty: III (see Ratings for explanation)
Publisher: Manhattan Beach Music
Cost: Score and Parts (digital) - $75.00  |   Score Only (digital) - $15.00


Instrumentation (Flexible)

Full Score
Part 1

  • Flute
  • Oboe
  • B-flat Soprano Clarinet
  • B-flat Trumpet
  • Violin

Part 2

  • B-flat Soprano Clarinet
  • E-flat Alto Saxophone
  • B-flat Trumpet
  • Violin

Part 3

  • B-flat Soprano Clarinet
  • E-flat Alto Saxophone
  • Horn in F
  • Viola

Part 4

  • Bassoon
  • B-flat Soprano Clarinet
  • B-flat Bass Clarinet
  • B-flat Tenor Saxophone
  • Trombone
  • Euphonium
  • Horn in F
  • Cello

Part 5

  • Bassoon
  • B-flat Bass Clarinet
  • E-flat Contra-alto Clarinet
  • B-flat Tenor Saxophone
  • E-flat Baritone Saxophone
  • Trombone
  • Euphonium
  • Tuba
  • String Bass
  • Cello

Part 6

  • B-flat Bass Clarinet
  • B-flat Contrabass Clarinet
  • E-flat Baritone Saxophone
  • Tuba
  • String Bass

Timpani
Percussion I-II, including:

  • Chimes
  • Crash Cymbals
  • Snare Drum
  • Suspended Cymbals
  • Triangle (small)


Errata

None discovered thus far.


Program Notes

Ticheli’s setting of the famous folksong is simple yet charming, preserving faithfully the melody and adding interesting harmonic vocabulary. Loch Lomond tells the tale of two Scottish soldiers who were imprisoned at Carlisle Castle in England, following the Battle of Culloden Moor. One of the soldiers was to be executed, while the other was to be set free. According to Celtic legend, those who died in foreign lands had their spirits travel to their homelands through the “low road,” the route for the souls of the departed. The song is from the point of view of the soldier to be executed, who tells his friend “ye’ll tak’ the high road and I’ll tak’ the low road,” in effect saying that the freed soldier will return alive, while he himself would return in spirit. He remembers his past and the “bonnie lass” (pretty girl) he will never see again, and sadly accepts death.

Loch Lomond was commissioned by the Stewarton Academy Senior Wind Ensemble of East Ayrshire, Scotland, Nigel Durno, conductor. It received its premiere on 18 June 2002 by the commissioning ensemble at Royal Concert Hall in Glasgow, Scotland.

- Program Notes (2002 edition) by Nikk Pilato


At the time in Scottish history when Loch Lomond was a new song, the United Kingdom (which united Scotland, England, and Wales) had already been formed. But the Highland Scots wanted a Scottish, not an English, king to rule. Led by their Bonnie Prince Charlie (Prince Charles Edward Stuart) they attempted unsuccessfully to depose Britain's King George II. An army of 7,000 Highlanders were defeated on April 16, 1746, at the famous Battle of Culloden Moor.

- Program Note (2002 edition) from University of Wisconsin – Eau Claire University Band concert program, 26 November 2018


Commercial Discography

None discovered thus far.


Audio Links


State Ratings

None discovered thus far.


Performances

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Works for Winds by this Composer

Adaptable Music


All Wind Works


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