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Korean Folk Rhapsody (flex)

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James Curnow

Arranged by James Curnow


General Info

Year: 1988 / 2011
Duration: c. 2:45
Difficulty: II-1/2 (see Ratings for explanation)
Original Medium: Folk Song
Publisher: Hal Leonard
Cost: Score and Parts (print) - $55.00; (digital) - $55.00   |   Score Only (print) - $5.00


Instrumentation (Flexible)

Full Score
Part 1

  • Flute
  • Oboe
  • B-flat Clarinet
  • B-flat Trumpet
  • Violin

Part 2

  • B-flat Clarinet
  • B-flat Trumpet
  • E-flat Alto Saxophone
  • Violin

Part 3

  • B-flat Clarinet
  • B-flat Tenor Saxophone
  • E-flat Alto Saxophone
  • E-flat Alto Clarinet
  • F Horn
  • Violin
  • Viola

Part 4

  • B-flat Tenor Saxophone
  • Euphonium T.C
  • F Horn
  • Trombone
  • Euphonium B.C.
  • Bassoon
  • Cello

Part 5

  • B-flat Bass Clarinet
  • Trombone
  • Euphonium B.C.
  • Bassoon
  • Euphonium T.C.
  • Cello
  • B-flat Baritone Saxophone
  • Tuba
  • String/Electric Bass

Timpani
Percussion I-II-III, including:

  • Bells
  • Suspended Cymbal, large and small
  • Tambourine
  • Vibraphone
  • Wind Chimes
  • Xylophone


Errata

None discovered thus far.


Program Notes

The piece is based on the folk song Ahrirang and takes this beautiful tune through several styles. Most of the percussion instruments used are ordinary instruments.

-Program Note from score


Arirang is a Korean folk song that is often considered to be the anthem of Korea. There are about 3,600 variations of 60 different versions of the song, all of which include a refrain similar to, "Arirang, arirang, arariyo." It is estimated the song is more than 600 years old.

Arirang is included twice on the UNESCO Intangible Cultural Heritage list. South Korea successfully submitted the song for inclusion on the UNESCO list in 2012. North Korea also successfully submitted the song for inclusion in 2014. In 2015, the South Korean Cultural Heritage Administration added the song to its list of important intangible cultural assets. The song is sung today in both North and South Korea, a symbol of unity in an otherwise divided country, since the Korean war.

- Program Note from Wikipedia


Commercial Discography

None discovered thus far.


Media


State Ratings

None discovered thus far.


Performances

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Works for Winds by this Composer

Adaptable Music


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