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Hark the Herald Angels Sing (flex)

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Julie Giroux

Carol arranged by Julie Giroux


General Info

Year: 1739 / 2020
Duration: c. 1:55
Difficulty: II (see Ratings for explanation)
Original Medium: Carol
Publisher: Music Propria
Cost: Score and Parts (digital) - Free


Instrumentation (Flexible)

Full Score
Condensed Score
Part 1

  • Flute
  • Oboe
  • B-flat Soprano Clarinet
  • B-flat Soprano Saxophone
  • B-flat Trumpet
  • Violin I

Part 2

  • B-flat Soprano Clarinet
  • E-flat Alto Saxophone
  • B-flat Trumpet
  • Violin II
  • Viola

Part 3

  • B-flat Soprano Clarinet
  • E-flat Alto Saxophone
  • B-flat Trumpet
  • Horn in F
  • Violin II
  • Viola

Part 4

  • B-flat Bass Clarinet
  • B-flat Tenor Saxophone
  • E-flat Baritone Saxophone
  • Trombone
  • Euphonium
  • Horn in F
  • Cello

Part 5

  • Bassoon
  • Contrabassoon
  • B-flat Bass Clarinet
  • E-flat Baritone Saxophone
  • Trombone
  • Euphonium
  • Tuba
  • String Bass
  • Electric Bass
  • Cello


Errata

None discovered thus far.


Program Notes

Hark! The Herald Angels Sing is a Christmas carol that first appeared in 1739 in the collection Hymns and Sacred Poems, having been written by Charles Wesley. Wesley had requested and received slow and solemn music for his lyrics, not the joyful tune expected today. Moreover, Wesley's original opening couplet is "Hark! how all the welkin rings / Glory to the King of Kings".

The popular version is the result of alterations by various hands, notably by Wesley's co-worker George Whitefield who changed the opening couplet to the familiar one, and by Felix Mendelssohn. A hundred years after the publication of Hymns and Sacred Poems, in 1840, Mendelssohn composed a cantata to commemorate Johann Gutenberg's invention of the printing press, and it is music from this cantata, adapted by the English musician William H. Cummings to fit the lyrics of Hark! The Herald Angels Sing, that propels the carol known today.

- Program Note from Wikipedia


Commercial Discography

None discovered thus far.


Media


State Ratings

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