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Hark! Those Bells Are Smokin’

From Wind Repertory Project
Julie Giroux

Julie Giroux


General Info

Year: 2011
Duration: c. 4:10
Difficulty: IV (see Ratings for explanation)
Publisher: Musica Propria
Cost: Score and Parts (print) - $100.00   |   Score Only (print) - $20.00


Instrumentation

Full Score
Flute I-II
Oboe I-II
Bassoon I-II
Contra-Bassoon
B-flat Soprano Clarinet I-II-III
B-flat Bass Clarinet
E-flat Contra Alto Clarinet
B-flat Contrabass Clarinet
B-flat Soprano Saxophone
E-flat Alto Saxophone I-II
B-flat Tenor Saxophone
E-flat Baritone Saxophone
B-flat Trumpet I-II-III
Horn in F I-II-III-IV
Trombone I-II-III
Bass Trombone
Euphonium
Tuba
String Bass
Timpani
Percussion I-II, including:

  • Bass Drum
  • Chimes
  • Crash Cymbals
  • Hi-Hat
  • Orchestra Chimes
  • Sleigh Bells
  • Snare Drum
  • Suspended Cymbal
  • Temple Blocks
  • Tenor Drum
  • Vibraphone


Errata

None discovered thus far.


Program Notes

This arrangement is a combination of Hark! The Herald Angels Sing! and Jingle Bells.

Hark! The Herald Angels Sing! lyrics were written by Charles Wesley in 1739. The music is by Felix Mendelssohn from the second chorus of his cantata Festgesang celebrating the invention of the printing press. In 1855 Dr. William Cummings put the words and music together creating the Christmas carol we know today.

Jingle Bells is the most recognizable of all Christmas music and is one of the top twenty-five most recorded songs in history. Composed by the son of an abolitionist minister and a runaway at the age of 14, James Pierpont composed the song sometime during the late 1840s or early 1850s. Though he grew up in New England, his free spirit travels took him overseas to the Pacific, then to the California Gold Rush. Eventually Pierpont made it back to Massachusetts, married and had children and upon the death of his wife, moved to Georgia where he remarried and had more children. He fought on the Confederate side of the Civil War and eventually was buried in Savannah, Georgia. He never made any money off his copyright of Jingle Bells and the original lyrics are housed in The Library of Congress.

- Program Note by composer


Commercial Discography


Media


State Ratings

None discovered thus far.


Performances

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Works for Winds by this Composer


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