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For Love of the Mountains

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Aaron Jay Kernis

Aaron Jay Kernis


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Subtitle: Four Tableaux


General Info

Year: 2016
Duration: c. 7:00
Difficulty: (see Ratings for explanation)
Publisher: G. Schirmer
Cost: Score and Parts – Rental


Instrumentation

Full Score
C Piccolo
Flute I-II
Oboe
English Horn
Bassoon I-II
Contrabassoon
E-flat Soprano Clarinet
B-flat Soprano Clarinet I-II
B-flat Trumpet I-II-III-IV
Horn in F I-II-III-IV
Trombone I-II
Bass Trombone
Tuba
String Bass I-II
Timpani
Percussion I-II-III

(percussion detail desired)


Errata

None discovered thus far.


Program Notes

For Love of the Mountains is a brief fanfare for winds, brass and percussion that announces and celebrates the occasion of the 10th anniversary of Maestro Donald Runnicles' directorship of the Grand Teton Music Festival. I couldn't help but visualize the sense of space and height of the Tetons while writing it, and tried to create a sense of grandeur and openness that the mountains evoke in my memory.

A confection such as this piece is but a token of a much larger affection and esteem that this orchestra, its players, board, staff and I hold for Donald. He is a truly inspiring musician and leader, and an extraordinary human being, and the notes and inspiration behind it are offered from the heart, with the generous support of so many who have been touched by his presence and music-making over the last ten years.

- Program Note by composer


Media

(Needed - please join the WRP if you can help.)


State Ratings

None discovered thus far.


Performances

To submit a performance please join The Wind Repertory Project

  • University of Maryland (College Park) Wind Orchestra (Michael Votta, conductor) – 6 October 2017


Works for Winds by This Composer


Resources

None discovered thus far.