Please DONATE to help with maintenance and upkeep of the Wind Repertory Project!

Finale Symphony No. VIII (arr Schaefer)

From Wind Repertory Project
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Antonín Dvořák

Antonín Dvořák (arr. William A. Schaefer)


The underlying work bears the designation Op. 88, B. 163.


General Info

Year: 1889 / 1980
Duration: c. 9:00
Difficulty: V (see Ratings for explanation)
Original Medium: Orchestra
Publisher: Shawnee Press
Cost: Score and Parts (print) - $90.00   |   Score Only (print) - $12.00

For further availability information, see Discussion tab, above.


Instrumentation

Full Score
Flute I-II
Oboe I-II
Bassoon I-II
E-flat Clarinet
B-flat Soprano Clarinet I-II-III
E-flat Alto Clarinet
B-flat Bass Clarinet
E-flat Contra-Alto Clarinet
B-flat Contrabass Clarinet
E-flat Soprano Saxophone
E-flat Alto Saxophone I-II
B-flat Tenor Saxophone
E-flat Baritone Saxophone
B-flat Cornet I-II-III
B-flat Trumpet I-II
Horn in F I-II-III-IV
Trombone I-II
Bass Trombone
Euphonium
Tuba
String Bass
Timpani
Percussion, including:

  • Bass Drum
  • Crash Cymbals
  • Snare Drum


Errata

None discovered thus far.


Program Notes

The Symphony No. 8 in G major, Op. 88, B. 163, is a symphony by Antonín Dvořák, composed in 1889 at Vysoká u Příbramě, Bohemia, on the occasion of his election to the Bohemian Academy of Science, Literature and Arts. Dvořák conducted the premiere in Prague on 2 February 1890.

In contrast to other symphonies of both the composer and the period, the music is cheerful and optimistic. It was originally published as Symphony No. 4.

The finale, formally a "complex theme-and-variations", is the most turbulent movement. It begins with a fanfare of trumpets The music progresses to a beautiful melody which is first played by the cellos. The tension is masterfully built and finally released at approximately two minutes into the piece, with a cascade of instruments triumphantly playing the initial theme at a somewhat faster pace. A central contrasting episode is derived from the main theme. From there the movement compellingly progresses through a tempestuous middle section, modulating from major to minor several times throughout. After a return to the slow, lyrical section, the piece ends on a chromatic coda, in which brass and timpani are greatly prominent.

Laki summarizes:

Dvorák's handling of form is indebted to Beethoven and Brahms, but he filled out the form with melodies of an unmistakably Czech flavor and a joviality few composers at the time possessed. The variations vary widely in character: some are slower and some are faster in tempo, some are soft (such as the virtuosic one for solo flute), and some are noisy; most are in the major mode, though the central one, reminiscent of a village band, is in the minor. The music is always cheerful and optimistic."

- Program Note from Wikipedia


Media

(Needed - please join the WRP if you can help.)


State Ratings

  • Louisiana: V
  • Tennessee: VI
  • Texas: V. Complete
  • Virginia: VI


Performances

To submit a performance please join The Wind Repertory Project


Works for Winds by This Composer

Adaptable Music


All Wind Works


Resources