Please DONATE to help with maintenance and upkeep of the Wind Repertory Project!

Eyes of the Dragon

From Wind Repertory Project
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Travis J. Weller

Travis J Weller


General Info

Year: 2014
Duration: c. 2:00
Difficulty: II (see Ratings for explanation)
Publisher: FJH Music Co.
Cost: Score and Parts (print) - $55.00   |   Score Only (print) - $7.00


Instrumentation

Full Score
Flute
Oboe
Bassoon
B-flat Soprano Clarinet I-II
B-flat Bass Clarinet
E-flat Alto Saxophone
B-flat Tenor Saxophone
E-flat Baritone Saxophone
B-flat Trumpet I-II
Horn in F
Trombone I-II
Euphonium
Tuba
Timpani
Percussion I-II-III-IV, including:

  • Bass Drum
  • Bells
  • Crash Cymbals
  • Finger Cymbals
  • Gong
  • Snare Drum
  • Suspended Cymbal
  • Tom-Tom
  • Wood Block
  • Xylophone


Errata

None discovered thus far.


Program Notes

Established through folk traditions in both Europe and Asia, dragons have become legendary creatures inspiring countless movies, stories, books and games in many different cultures. While some cultures in Asia have portrayed the dragon as a type of large water-snake, many European stories have depicted them with scales, dorsal fins, four legs and wings. Some lore holds that dragons were fire-breathing, or poisonous like the creatures depicted in the poem Beowulf. Described as creatures of immense size and power, a warrior's mettle would be tested if they could defeat a dragon in battle.

This programmatic work for young band includes energetic rhythms in minor tonality depicting an epic battle between a solitary warrior and a dragon that threatens his kingdom. The warrior must risk fighting in close proximity to the immense beast, so close that he meets The Eyes of the Dragon.

- Program Note from score


Media


State Ratings

  • Alabama: Class C
  • North Carolina: II
  • Wisconsin: Event 3000 Concert Band Class C


Performances

To submit a performance please join The Wind Repertory Project


Works for Winds by This Composer


Resources

  • "New Music Reviews." The Instrumentalist 70.7 (2016): 58. Print