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Chanson for Christmas

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Gregory B. Rudgers

Gregory B Rudgers


General Info

Year: 2009
Duration: c. 5:30
Difficulty: III (see Ratings for explanation)
Publisher: Carl Fischer Publications
Cost: Score & Parts - $85.00    |   Score Only - $12.00


Instrumentation

Full Score
C Piccolo
Flute I-II
Oboe
Bassoon
B-flat Soprano Clarinet I-II-III
B-flat Bass Clarinet
E-flat Alto Saxophone I-II
B-flat Tenor Saxophone
E-flat Baritone Saxophone
B-flat Trumpet I-II-III
Horn in F I-II
Trombone I-II-III
Euphonium
Tuba
Timpani
Percussion I-II, including:

  • Bass Drum
  • Crash Cymbals
  • Glockenspiel
  • Tambourine
  • Snare Drum
  • Suspended Cymbal
  • Tenor Drum
  • Tubular Bells
  • Xylophone


Errata

None discovered thus far.


Program Notes

A serious new composition based on the holiday classic Bring A Torch Jeannette Isabella. Composer Gregory Rudgers gives us a contest-style work that will serve the dual purpose of providing holiday concert material and presenting a solid piece of band literature on which to build your students' musicianship.

-Program note by publisher


The opening measures should be performed in a bold and majestic style with marcato brasses, sweeping woodwinds, and emphatic percussion. Feel free to use rubato and 'expressivo' in your interpretation of the middle chorale, as this section lends itself well to individual interpretation. The dance, "A la Dancia," should begin with a light chamber-music feel and gradually grow to become powerful and expressive. The return of the fanfare style at the very end should accurately reflect the opening bars, but perhaps with a bit more of a sense of finality.

-Performance note by composer


Bring a Torch, Jeanette, Isabelle (in French, “Un flambeau, Jeannette, Isabelle”) is a Christmas carol that originated in the Provence region of France in the 16th century. The carol was first published in 1553, and was translated into English in the 18th century. The song was originally not a song to be sung at Christmas, but rather was dance music for French nobility. In the carol, visitors to the stable have to keep their voices down so the newborn can enjoy his dreams. To this day in the Provence region, children dress up as shepherds and milkmaids, carrying torches and candles to Midnight Mass on Christmas Eve, while singing the carol. The painter Georges de La Tour painted a nativity scene based on the carol.

-Program note by San Luis Obispo Wind Orchestra


For Candy.


Media

Sample download; ensemble and conductor unknown


State Ratings

None discovered thus far.


Performances

To submit a performance please join The Wind Repertory Project


Works for Winds by This Composer


Resources