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Adeste Fidelis (flex)

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Carol, arranged by Christian McIvor


General Info

Year: 2016 / 2020
Duration: c. 3:30
Difficulty: IV-1/2 (see Ratings for explanation)
Original Medium: Brass quintet
Publisher: C. Alan Publications
Cost: Score and Parts (print) - $60.00   |   Score Only (print) - $12.00


Instrumentation (Flexible)

Full Score
Part 1

  • Flute
  • Oboe
  • B-flat Soprano Clarinet
  • B-flat Trumpet
  • Violin

Part 2

  • B-flat Soprano Clarinet
  • E-flat Alto Saxophone
  • B-flat Trumpet
  • Violin

Part 3

  • B-flat Soprano Clarinet
  • E-flat Alto Saxophone
  • B-flat Trumpet
  • Violin
  • Viola

Part 4

  • Bassoon
  • B-flat Tenor Saxophone
  • Trombone
  • Euphonium
  • Horn in F
  • Cello

Part 5

  • Bassoon
  • B-flat Bass Clarinet
  • E-flat Baritone Saxophone
  • Trombone
  • Euphonium
  • Tuba
  • String Bass

Timpani (optional)
Percussion I-II-III (optional), including:

  • Bass Drum
  • Chimes
  • Crash Cymbals
  • Glockenspiel
  • Snare Drum
  • Suspended Cymbal


Errata

None discovered thus far.


Program Notes

Set primarily in a march-like style with a more lyrical song-like interlude, McIvor's brass quintet arrangement of Adeste Fidelis has been adapted for flexible five-part wind band with optional percussion.

- Program Note from publisher


O Come, All Ye Faithful (originally written in Latin as Adeste Fideles) is a Christmas carol that has been attributed to various authors, including John Francis Wade (1711–1786), John Reading (1645–1692), King John IV of Portugal (1604–1656), and anonymous Cistercian monks. The earliest printed version is in a book published by Wade, but the earliest manuscript bears the name of King John IV, and is located in the library of the Ducal Palace of Vila Viçosa. A manuscript by Wade, dating to 1751, is held by Stonyhurst College in Lancashire.\

The original four verses of the hymn were extended to a total of eight, and these have been translated into many languages. The English translation of O Come, All Ye Faithful by the English Catholic priest Frederick Oakeley, written in 1841, is widespread in most English-speaking countries.

- Program Note from Wikipedia


Performance Notes

Each part is transposed and playable by a multitude of wind or keyboard percussion instruments while maintaining the spectrum of sound we have grown to love about the wind band.


Media


State Ratings

None discovered thus far.


Performances

To submit a performance please join The Wind Repertory Project

  • Philadelphia (Penn.) Wind Symphony (Paul Bryan, conductor) - 17 December 2021


Works for Winds by This Composer


Resources