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William Tell Overture (arr Stanton)

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Gioacchino Rossini

Gioacchino Rossini (arr. Scott Stanton)


Subtitle: Finale


General Info

Year: 1829 / 2009
Duration: c. 2:30
Difficulty: III-1/2 (see Ratings for explanation)
Original Medium: Orchestra
Publisher: C.L. Barnhouse
Cost: Score and Parts (print) - $60.00   |   Score Only (print) - $7.00


Instrumentation (Flexible)

Full Score
Part 1

  • C Treble
  • High B-flat
  • High E-flat

Part 2

  • C Treble
  • High B-flat
  • High E-flat
  • Horn in F

Part 3

  • Low B-flat
  • Low E-flat
  • Bass Clef
  • Horn in F
  • Viola

Part 4

  • Low B-flat
  • Low E-flat
  • Bass Clef
  • Bass
  • Tuba

Keyboards (optional)
Timpani (optional)
Percussion, including:

  • Mallets (optional)
  • Bass Drum
  • Snare Drum
  • Crash Cymbal

Guitar (optional)


Errata

None discovered thus far.


Program Notes

The William Tell Overture is the overture to the opera William Tell (original French title Guillaume Tell), whose music was composed by Gioachino Rossini. William Tell premiered in 1829 and was the last of Rossini's 39 operas, after which he went into semi-retirement, although he continued to compose cantatas, sacred music and secular vocal music.

There has been repeated use (and sometimes parody) of parts of this overture in both classical music and popular media, most famously as the theme music for The Lone Ranger in radio, television and film. It was also used as the theme music for the British television series The Adventures of William Tell.

The overture, which lasts for approximately 12 minutes, paints a musical picture of life in the Swiss Alps, the setting of the opera. It was described by Berlioz (who usually loathed Rossini's works) as "a symphony in four parts", but unlike a symphony with its discrete movements, the overture's parts transition from one to the next without any break.

Finale, March Of The Swiss Soldiers: The Finale, often called the "March of the Swiss Soldiers" in English, is in E major like the Prelude, but is an ultra-dynamic galop heralded by trumpets and played by the full orchestra. It alludes to the final act, which recounts the Swiss soldiers' victorious battle to liberate their homeland from Austrian repression. Although there are no horses or cavalry charges in the opera, this segment is often used in popular media to denote galloping horses, a race, or a hero riding to the rescue. Its most famous use in that respect is as the theme music for The Lone Ranger, so famous that the term "intellectual" has been defined as "a man who can listen to the William Tell Overture without thinking of the Lone Ranger." The Finale is also quoted by Dmitri Shostakovich in the first movement of his Symphony No. 15.

- Program Note from Wikipedia


Commercial Discography

None discovered thus far.


Media


State Ratings

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