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Timepiece

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Cindy McTee

Cindy McTee


General Info

Year: 2000, rev. 2001
Duration: c. 8:00
Difficulty: VII (see Ratings for explanation)
Original Medium: Orchestra
Publisher: Bill Holab Music
Cost: Score and Parts - Rental   |   Full Score Only $100.00


Instrumentation

Full Score
Piccolo
Flute I -II
Oboe I-II
Bassoon I-II
Contrabassoon
Eb Soprano Clarinet
Bb Soprano Clarinet I-II-III
Bb Bass Clarinet
Eb Contra-Alto Clarinet
Soprano Saxophone
Alto Saxophone
Tenor Saxophone
Baritone Saxophone
Piccolo Trumpet in Bb
Trumpet (in Bb) I-II-III
Horn in F I-II-III-IV
Trombone I-II
Bass Trombone
Euphonium
Tuba
String Bass
Piano
Timpani
Percussion I-II-III-IV

  • Bass Drum
  • Bongos (4)
  • Castanets
  • Cowbells (medium and large)
  • Cymbals (medium and large suspended)
  • Hi-Hat
  • Marimba
  • Ratchet
  • Splash Cymbal
  • Shaker (metal)
  • Tambourine
  • Triangle
  • Tom-Toms (4)
  • Vibraslap
  • Washboard
  • Wood Block
  • Xylophone


Errata

None discovered thus far.


Program Notes

Premiered on February 17, 2000, under the direction of Andrew Litton, the original version of Timepiece was commissioned by the Dallas Symphony Orchestra for its 100th Anniversary Season. A transcription for winds was subsequently commissioned by a consortium of ensembles affiliated with the College Band Director National Association and premiered on February 22, 2001, with Eugene Migliaro Corporon conducting the North Texas Wind Symphony. I have dedicated this transcription to the memory of Martin Mailman (1932-2000), friend and colleague for many years at the University of North Texas, without whose encouragement I might never have transcribed an earlier work, Circuits, for wind ensemble.

I entitled the work Timepiece, not only for its connection to the celebration of special events marking the Dallas Symphony Orchestra's one hundredth anniversary and the beginning of a new millennium, but also for the manner in which musical time shapes the work. The piece begins slowly, "before" time, in a womb-like, subjective, holding place. And then a clock-like pulse emerges, takes control, and provides the driving force behind a sustained, highly energized second section of about six minutes.

Much of my recent thinking about music is informed by the writings of Carl G. Jung who, in the words of Anthony Storr, "felt that the whole energy of mental functioning" sprang from the tension between the oppositions of conscious and unconscious, of thought and feeling, of mind and body, of objectivity and subjectivity. So too have the integration and reconciliation of opposing elements become important aspects of my work: the frequent use of circular patterns, or ostinatos, offer both the movement; carefully controlled pitch systems and thematic manipulations provide a measure of objectivity and reason, while kinetic rhythmic structures inspire bodily motion; discipline yields to improvisation; and perhaps most importantly, humor takes its place comfortably along side the grave and earnest. I wish both to enlighten and to entertain, to communicate wholeness, and above all, to celebrate life!

- Program Note by Cindy McTee


Commercial Discography


State Ratings

None discovered thus far.


Performances

To submit a performance please join The Wind Repertory Project

  • University of Michigan (Ann Arbor) Concert Band (Courtney Snyder, conductor) – 7 February 2018
  • Florida International University Wind Ensemble (Catherine Rand, conductor) - November 19, 2009
  • Hartt Symphony Band (Glen Adsit, conductor) - 19 October 2007.
  • University of New Hampshire (Andrew Boysen, conductor) - 17 October 2007.
  • MTSU Wind Ensemble (Reed Thomas, conductor) - 22 September 2006.
  • Western Illinois University (Michael Fansler, conductor) - 31 March 2006.


Works for Winds by this Composer


Resources

  • Miles, Richard B., and Larry Blocher. 2002. Teaching Music Through Performance in Band. Volume 4. Chicago: GIA Publications. pp. 935-942.