Symphony No 9 (Dvorak) (arr Laughlin)

From Wind Repertory Project
Antonín Dvořák

Antonín Dvořák (arr. Tim Laughlin)


Subtitle: From the New World


General Info

Year: 1893 / 2023
Duration: c. 45:00
Difficulty: VI (see Ratings for explanation)
Original Medium: Orchestra
Publisher: Tim Laughlin
Cost: Score and Parts - $84.95   |   Score Only - $20.00


Movements

1. Adagio—Allegro molto
2. Largo
3. Scherzo: Molto vivace
4. Finale: Allegro con fuoco


Instrumentation

Full Score
Piccolo
Flute I-II
Oboe I-II
English Horn
Bassoon I-II
Contrabassoon
E-flat Clarinet
B-flat Clarinet I-II-III
B-flat Bass Clarinet
E-flat Contralto Clarinet
E-flat Alto Saxophone I-II
Tenor Saxophone
E-flat Baritone Saxophone
B-flat Trumpet I-II-III-IV
Horn in F I-II-III-IV
Trombone I-II
Trombone III (Bass)
Euphonium
Tuba
String Bass
Timpani
Percussion, including:

  • Crash Cymbals
  • Marimba
  • Triangle


Errata

None discovered thus far.


Program Notes

The Symphony No. 9 in E minor, "From the New World", Op. 95, B. 178, popularly known as the New World Symphony, was composed by Antonín Dvořák in 1893 while he was the director of the National Conservatory of Music of America from 1892 to 1895. It premiered in New York City on 16 December 1893. It has been described as one of the most popular of all symphonies. In older literature and recordings, this symphony was – as for its first publication – numbered as Symphony No. 5. Astronaut Neil Armstrong took a tape recording of the New World Symphony along during the Apollo 11 mission, the first Moon landing, in 1969. The symphony was completed in the building that now houses the Bily Clocks Museum in Spillville, Iowa.

The fourth and final movement, marked "Allegro con fuoco," is written in sonata form. After a brief introduction, the horns and trumpets declare the movement's main theme against sharp chords played by the rest of the orchestra. The second theme is then presented by the clarinet above tremolos in the strings. The development not only works with these two themes but also recalls the main themes of the first and second movements and a fragment of the Scherzo. Following the recapitulation which begins in the unexpected key of G minor but later corrects itself back to the original key, the movement reaches its climax in the coda, in which materials from the first three movements are reviewed for a final time while the Picardy third is expanded after the orchestra triumphantly plays a "modally altered" plagal cadence.

- Program Note from Wikipedia


Media

None discovered thus far.


State Ratings

None discovered thus far.


Performances

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Works for Winds by this Composer

Adaptable Music


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Resources