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Symphony I (Shostakovich)

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Dmitri Shostakovich

Dmitri Shostakovich (trans. Russell Scarbrough)


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This work bears the designation Opus 10.


General Info

Year: 1924-25
Duration: c. 30:00
Difficulty: VII (see Ratings for explanation)
Publisher: Unknown
Cost: Score and Parts - Unknown


Instrumentation

Full Score
Piccolo
Flute I-II
Oboe I-II
E-flat Soprano Clarinet
B-flat Soprano Clarinet I-II-III
E-flat Alto Clarinet
B-flat Bass Clarinet
Bassoon I-II
E-flat Alto Saxophone
B-flat Tenor Saxophone
E-flat Baritone Saxophone
B-flat Trumpet I-II-III
Horn in F I-II-III-IV
Trombone I-II
Bass Trombone
Euphonium
Tuba
String Bass
Piano
Timpani
Percussion, including:

  • Bass Drum
  • Crash Cymbals
  • Glockenspiel
  • Tam-tam
  • Triangle


Errata

None discovered thus far.


Program Notes

The Symphony No. 1 in F minor (Opus 10) by Dmitri Shostakovich was written in 1924–1925, and first performed in Leningrad by the Leningrad Philharmonic under Nikolai Malko on 12 May 1926. Shostakovich wrote the work as his graduation piece at the Petrograd Conservatory, completing it at the age of 19.

The work has four movements – Allegretto, Allegro, Lento and Allegro molto --( the last two being played without interruption) and is approximately half an hour in length.

This symphony was a tremendous success from its premiere, and is still considered today as one of Shostakovich's finest works. It displays an interesting and characteristic combination of liveliness and wit on the one hand, and drama and tragedy on the other. In some ways it is reminiscent of the works of Igor Stravinsky and Sergei Prokofiev. The transparent and chamber-like orchestration of the First Symphony is in quite a contrast to the complex and sophisticated Mahlerian orchestrations found in many of his later symphonies, and the assurance with which the composer imagines, then realizes, large-scale structure is as impressive as his vigor and freshness of gesture.

- Program Note from Wikipedia


Media

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State Ratings

None discovered thus far.


Performances

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Works for Winds by This Composer


Resources