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Seven Hills Overture

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John Fannin

John Fannin


General Info

Year: 2014
Duration: c. 5:00
Difficulty: IV (see Ratings for explanation)
Publisher: Alfred Music
Cost: Score and Parts - $80.00   |   Score Only - $10.00


Instrumentation

Full Score
Flute I-II
Oboe
Bassoon
B-flat Soprano Clarinet I-II-III
B-flat Bass Clarinet
E-flat Alto Saxophone I-II
B-flat Tenor Saxophone
E-flat Baritone Saxophone
B-flat Trumpet I-II-III
Horn in F I-II
Trombone I-II-III
Euphonium
Tuba
String Bass
Timpani
Percussion, including:

  • Snare Drum
  • Crash Cymbals
  • Bells
  • Bongos
  • Chimes
  • Hi-Hat
  • Marimba
  • Vibraphone
  • Xylophone


Errata

None discovered thus far.


Program Notes

Seven Hills Overture is an exciting fanfare that utilizes shifting meters to create a light, happy groove. A lyrical interlude provides an opportunity for ensembles to explore rubato playing. The title is inspired by the seven hills that surround Bowling Green, Kentucky.

Commissioned by the Kentucky Music Educators Third District for the 2013 Ninth and Tenth Grade District Honor Band, the premier performance in Bowling Green, Kentucky, was conducted by the composer.

- Program Note from score


Seven Hills Overture by John Fannin begins with a festive brass and saxophone fanfare marked “Allegro,” but soon the piece goes through frequent meter shifts, establishing a light and effervescent dance-like quality. A complementary middle section, marked “Andante moderato,” is more legato cantabile, alternates between woodwind and brass choirs, and features flute and euphonium solos. A return of the opening material leads to a satisfying finale.

- Program Note from The Instrumentalist


Media


State Ratings

None discovered thus far.


Performances

To submit a performance please join The Wind Repertory Project


Works for Winds by This Composer


Resources

  • The Instrumentalist, Vol. 69, No. 2 (September 2014), p. 38.