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Ode to Joy

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Ludwig van Beethoven

Ludwig van Beethoven (arr. Scott Stanton)


Subtitle: Theme from 9th Symphony, Mvt. 4


General Info

Year: 1824 / 2020
Duration: c. 2:45
Difficulty: III (see Ratings for explanation)
Original Medium: Orchestra
Publisher: C.L. Barnhouse
Cost: Score and Parts (print) - $60.00   |   Score Only (print) - $8.00


Instrumentation (Flexible)

Full Score
Part 1
C Instruments

  • Piccolo
  • Flute
  • Violin

B-flat Instruments

  • B-flat Clarinet
  • B-flat Soprano Saxophone
  • B-flat Trumpet

E-flat Instruments

  • E-flat Clarinet
  • E-flat Alto Saxophone

Part 2
C Instruments

  • Piccolo
  • Flute
  • Violin

B-flat Instruments

  • B-flat Clarinet
  • B-flat Trumpet

E-flat Instruments

  • E-flat Alto Saxophone
  • Horn in E-flat

Horn in F
Part 3
B-flat Instruments

  • B-flat Bass Clarinet
  • B-flat Tenor Saxophone
  • B-flat Trombone T.C.
  • Euphonium T.C.

E-flat Instruments

  • E-flat Alto Clarinet
  • E-flat Baritone Saxophone
  • Horn in E-flat

Bass Clef

  • Bassoon
  • Trombone
  • Euphonium B.C.
  • Cello

Horn in F
Viola
Part 4
Tuba
Bass Part

  • Bassoon
  • Trombone
  • Euphonium B.C.
  • String Bass
  • Keyboard Bass
  • Electric Bass Guitar
  • Cello

B-flat Treble Clef Bass Part

  • B-flat Bass Clarinet
  • B-flat Contrabass Clarinet
  • B-flat Euphonium
  • B-flat Tuba T.C.

E-flat Treble Clef Bass Part

  • E-flat Alto Clarinet
  • E-flat Contra-Alto Clarinet
  • E-flat Baritone Saxophone
  • E-flat Tuba T.C.

Keyboards (optional)

  • Electric Piano
  • Synthesizer
  • Accordion
  • Organ

Timpani
Percussion

  • Bass Drum
  • Bells
  • Crash Cymbals
  • Marimba
  • Snare Drum
  • Suspended Cymbal
  • Vibraphone
  • Xylophone


Errata

None discovered thus far.


Program Notes

Ode to Joy was written in the summer of 1785 by German poet, playwright, and historian Friedrich Schiller, originally entitled Ode to Freedom. It is best known for the musical setting by Ludwig van Beethoven in the final movement of his Ninth Symphony, completed in 1824. The Council of Europe adopted it as the "Anthem of Europe" in 1972.

- Program Note from score


Performance Notes

Every ensemble will be different; your instrumentation is unique. There are no rules for part assignment, other than ensuring each part is played by at least one musician. Cover the parts with your strongest players first and then try to build woodwind and brass choirs within the ensemble.

If possible, all bass instruments should play the introduction. Add more instruments at m.9, building to the full ensemble tutti entrance at m. 21.

Consider thinning out the instrumentation at m. 41, featuring your strongest musicians as soloists on each part or have a few play each part. The full ensemble enters softly at m. 57 and builds to forte at m. 61. For a big finish, repeat the soft to loud dynamic format from m. 69 to the Fine.

This setting also works very well as a daily warm-up. I hope you enjoy Ode to Joy.


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