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Michael Gandolfi

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Michael Gandolfi

Biography

Michael Gandolfi (b. 5 July 1956, Melrose, Massachusetts) is an American composer of contemporary music.

He received the B.M. and M.M. degrees in composition from the New England Conservatory of Music, as well as fellowships for study at the Yale Summer School of Music and Art, the Composers Conference, and the Tanglewood Music Center.

Mr. Gandolfi is the recipient of numerous awards including grants from the Fromm Foundation, the Koussevitzky Music Foundation, the John Simon Guggenheim Foundation, the American Academy of Arts and Letters and the Massachusetts Cultural Council. His music has been performed by many leading ensembles including the Boston Symphony Orchestra, the BBC Symphony Orchestra, the San Francisco Symphony Orchestra, the Tanglewood Music Center Orchestra, the Orpheus Chamber Orchestra, the Saint Paul Chamber Orchestra, the Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra, Nieuw Sinfonietta Amsterdam, the Pro Arte Chamber Orchestra and the Boston Modern Orchestra Project He presently holds commissions from the Michael Vyner Trust (a piano concerto), the Fromm Foundation (a saxophone concerto for Kenneth Radnovsky and the Boston Modern Orchestra Project, 2007), the Weilerstein Trio, and Boston-based pianist Duncan Cumming.

Currently, he is a faculty member of the New England Conservatory of Music and the Tanglewood Music Center, and was a visiting lecturer on music at Harvard University in 2002, holding a similar position there from 1996-1999.


Works for Winds


References

  • Michael Gandolfi website
  • Richardson, Colleen. "Fanfares and Meditations on a Renaissance Theme." In Teaching Music through Performance in Band. Volume 9, edit. & comp. by Richard Miles, 912-927. Chicago: GIA Publications, 2013.
  • Williams, Nicholas Enrico. "Vientos y Tangos." In Teaching Music through Performance in Band. Volume 6, edit. & comp. by Richard Miles, 721-727. Chicago: GIA Publications, 2007.