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Joseph Bertolozzi

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Joseph Bertolozzi

Biography

Joseph Bertolozzi (b. 1959, Poughkeepsie, N.Y.) is an American composer and organist.

Bertolozzi was born one year after his parents and sister emigrated from Lucca, Italy, he was a voracious reader as a child. When his interest turned to music he read biographies of composers, music encyclopedias, and ultimately musical scores from the local library. He began organ lessons solely to learn how to notate the compositions he aspired to create.

He went on to receive his B.A. in music from Vassar College, and did further study at the Accademia Musicale Chigiana (with Xenakis and Donatoni), Westminster Choir College, and The Juilliard School, as well as numerous professional workshops with ASCAP, The American Music Center, and Carnegie Hall (contemporary conducting techniques with Boulez).

His concert music and theatrical scores have also enjoyed particular success, including The Contemplation of Bravery, an official 2002 Bicentennial commission for The United States Military Academy at West Point, and his incidental score to Waiting for Godot at the 1991 Festival Internationale de Café Theatre in Nancy, France. He also has a large body of liturgical music for use in both Christian and Jewish worship.

Joseph Bertolozzi forges a unique identity as a 21st century musician with works ranging from solo gongs to full symphony orchestra to sound-art installations. With increasingly numerous performances across the U.S. and Europe to his credit, his music is performed in concert halls and conservatories, and he himself has played at such diverse venues as The Vatican and The US Tennis Open.

His latest explorations in sound have brought him to Tower Music, using the Eiffel Tower in Paris itself as his instrument. This project builds upon Bridge Music, his “audacious plan” (New York Times) to compose music for a suspension bridge using New York’s Mid Hudson Bridge.


Works for Winds


References