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Invitation to the Dance (arr Meyrelles)

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Carl Maria von Weber

Carl Maria von Weber (arr. MC Meyrelles); rev. Katz)


This work is also known (incorrectly) as Invitation to the Waltz and Invitation à la Valse.


General Info

Year: 1819 / 1891
Duration:
Difficulty: VI (see Ratings for explanation)
Publisher: Carl Fischer

Cost: Score and Parts – Out of print

For availability information, see Discussion area.


Instrumentation

Full Score
D-flat Piccolo
Flute
Oboe
Bassoon
E-flat Clarinet
B-flat Soprano Clarinet Solo-I-II-III
B-flat Bass Clarinet
B-flat Soprano Saxophone
E-flat Alto Saxophone
B-flat Tenor Saxophone
E-flat Baritone Saxophone
E-flat Soprano Cornet
Cornets Solo-I-II-III
E-flat Horn or Alto I-II-III-IV
B-flat Tenor Horn I-II
Trombone I-II
Bass Trombone
Euphonium (Bass Clef & Treble Clef)
Tuba
Drums
Triangle


Errata

None discovered thus far.


Program Notes

Invitation to the Dance (Aufforderung zum Tanz), Op. 65, J. 260, is a piano piece in rondo form written by Carl Maria von Weber in 1819. It is also well known in the 1841 orchestration by Hector Berlioz. It is sometimes called Invitation to the Waltz, but this is a mistranslation of the original.

Weber dedicated Invitation to the Dance to his wife Caroline (they had been married only a few months). He labelled the work "rondeau brillante", and he wrote it while also writing his opera Der Freischütz. It was the first concert waltz to be written: that is, the first work in waltz form meant for listening rather than for dancing. John Warrack calls it "the first and still perhaps the most brilliant and poetic example of the Romantic concert waltz, creating within its little programmatic framework a tone poem that is also an apotheosis of the waltz in a manner that was to remain fruitful at least until Ravel's choreographic poem, La valse…".

It was also the first piece that, rather than being a tune for the dancers to dance to or a piece of abstract music, was a programmatic description of the dancers themselves.

Invitation to the Dance was part of the repertoire of Franz Liszt, Frédéric Chopin, and many other pianists.

- Program Note from Wikipedia


Commercial Discography

None discovered thus far.


State Ratings

  • Louisiana: V


Performances

To submit a performance please join The Wind Repertory Project


Works for Winds by this Composer


References