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Finale Excerpts, "Symphony No 9"

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Antonín Dvořák

Antonín Dvořák (arr. Larry Daehn)


Subtitle: From the New World


General Info

Year: 2010
Duration: c. 5:40
Difficulty: III (see Ratings for explanation)
Publisher: Daehn Publications through C.L. Barnhouse
Cost: Score and Parts (print) - $76.00   |   Score Only (print) - $6.00


Instrumentation

Full Score
Flute
Oboe
Bassoon
B-flat Soprano Clarinet I-II-III
B-flat Bass Clarinet
E-flat Alto Saxophone I-II
B-flat Tenor Saxophone
E-flat Baritone Saxophone
B-flat Trumpet I-II-III
Horn in F I-II
Trombone I-II-III
Bass Trombone
Euphonium
Tuba
Timpani
Percussion, including:

  • Bass Drum
  • Crash Cymbals
  • Snare Drum


Errata

None discovered thus far.


Program Notes

The Symphony No. 9 in E minor, "From the New World," Op. 95, B. 178, popularly known as the New World Symphony, was composed by Antonín Dvořák in 1893 while he was the director of the National Conservatory of Music of America from 1892 to 1895. It is by far his most popular symphony, and one of the most popular of all symphonies. Neil Armstrong took a recording of the New World Symphony to the Moon during the Apollo 11 mission, the first Moon landing, in 1969.

Dvořák, a Czech composer, worked in New York from 1892 to 1895, as the director of the National Conservatory of Music. His main goal in America was to discover "American Music" and engage in it, and he supported the concept that African-American and Native American music should be used as a foundation for the growth of American music. He also spent the summer of 1893 in Iowa, where he was influenced not only by music he had heard, but by what he had seen, in America. He wrote that he would not have composed his American pieces as he had, if he had not seen America. It has been said that Dvořák was inspired by the American "wide open spaces" such as prairies he may have seen on his trip to Iowa in the summer of 1893.

The symphony was commissioned by the New York Philharmonic, and premiered on December 16, 1893, at Carnegie Hall conducted by Anton Seidl, and was immediately warmly received.

- Program Note from Wikipedia


Commercial Discography

None discovered thus far.


Media Links


State Ratings

None discovered thus far.


Performances

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Works for Winds by this Composer

Adaptable Music


All Wind Works


Resources