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Fantasia on the "Dargason" (arr Stanton)

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Gustav Holst

Gustav Holst (arr. Scott Stanton)


Subtitle: From Second Suite in F by Holst


General Info

Year: 1911 / 2013
Duration: c. 2:40
Difficulty: III-1/2 (see Ratings for explanation)
Publisher: C.L. Barnhouse
Cost: Score and Parts (print) - $60.00   |   Score Only (print) - $8.00


Instrumentation (Flexible)

Full Score
Part 1

  • C Treble Part
  • High B-flat Part
  • High E-flat Part

Part 2

  • C Treble Part
  • High B-flat Part
  • High E-flat Part
  • F Horn Part

Part 3

  • Low B-flat Part
  • Low E-flat Part
  • Bass Clef Part
  • F Horn Part
  • Viola Part

Part 4

  • Low B-flat Part
  • Low E-flat Part
  • Bass Clef Part
  • Bass Part
  • Tuba Part

Keyboards (optional)
Timpani
Percussion, including:

  • Mallets (optional)
  • Bass Drum
  • Crash Cymbal
  • Tambourine
  • Triangle

Guitar (optional)


Errata

None discovered thus far.


Program Notes

This movement is not based on any folk songs, but rather has two tunes from Playford's Dancing Master of 1651. The finale of the suite opens with an alto saxophone solo based on the folk tune Dargason, a 16th-century English dance tune included in the first edition of The Dancing Master. The fantasia continues through several variations encompassing the full capabilities of the band. The final folk tune, Greensleeves, is cleverly woven into the fantasia by the use of hemiolas, with Dargason being in 6/8 and Greensleeves being in 3/4. At the climax of the movement, the two competing themes are placed in competing sections. As the movement dies down, a tuba and piccolo duet forms a call back to the beginning of the suite with the competition of low and high registers.

The name 'dargason' may perhaps come from an Irish legend that tells of a monster resembling a large bear (although much of the description of the creature has been lost over time). The Dargason tormented the Irish countryside. During the Irish uprising of the late 18th century, the dargason is supposed to have attacked a British camp, killing many soldiers. This tale aside, 'dargason' is more likely derived from an Old English word for dwarf or fairy, and the tune has been considered English (or Welsh) since at least the 16th century. It is also known as 'Sedony' (or Sedany) or 'Welsh Sedony'.

- Program Note from Wikipedia


Commercial Discography

None discovered thus far.


Media


State Ratings

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