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Edward Gregson

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Edward Gregson

Biography

Edward Gregson (b. 23 July 1945, Sunderland, UK) is one of Britain's most respected composers, whose music has been performed, broadcast and recorded worldwide. He studied composition (with Alan Bush) and piano at the Royal Academy of Music from 1963-7, winning five prizes for composition. He received early success with his Brass Quintet, which was broadcast and recorded (by the Philip Jones Brass Ensemble and the Hallé Brass Consort). Since then he has written orchestral, chamber, instrumental and choral music, as well as music for the theatre, film and television.

In recent years he has completed commissions for the Royal Liverpool Philharmonic, the Bournemouth Symphony, the Hallé and the BBC Philharmonic orchestras. His music has also been performed by many other international orchestras and ensembles. His major orchestral works include Music for Chamber Orchestra (1968), Metamorphoses (1979), Contrasts — a concerto for orchestra (1983 rev 2001), and Blazon (1991) as well as concertos for tuba (1976), trumpet (1983), clarinet (1994), piano (1997), violin (2000), saxophone (2006), and cello (2007). His choral and vocal music includes a song cycle Five Songs of Innocence and Experience (1980), Missa Brevis Pacem (1985) and The Dance, Forever the Dance (1999), for mezzo soprano, choir and orchestra. He has also made a significant contribution to the repertoire of brass and wind bands and ensembles. His instrumental and chamber music includes an oboe sonata (1965), a piano sonata (1983), Six Little Pieces for Piano (1985), two brass quintets (1967 and 1985), and music for violin and cello. His music for the theatre includes commissions from the York Festival and the Royal Shakespeare Company.

Edward Gregson is Principal of the Royal Northern College of Music in Manchester, a post he has held since 1996. Before that he had an academic career in music, mainly at Goldsmiths College, University of London, where he eventually became Professor of Music in 1994. He is also Chairman of Conservatoires UK and sits on the Boards of the Performing Right Society, the Associated Board of the Royal Schools of Music, and Chethams School of Music


Works for Winds


References