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California Dreamin’- Monday, Monday

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John Phillips

John Phillips (arr. Holcombe)


General Info

Year: 1965 / 1970
Duration: c. 2:50 (California Dreamin')
Difficulty: (see Ratings for explanation)
Original Medium: Rock Band
Publisher: Charter Publishing Co.
Cost: Score and Parts – Out of print

For availability information, see Discussion tab, above.


Instrumentation

Full Score
C Piccolo/Flute III
Flute I-II
Oboe I-II
Bassoon
E-flat Soprano Clarinet
B-flat Soprano Clarinet I-II-III
E-flat Alto Clarinet
B-flat Bass Clarinet
E-flat Contra Alto Clarinet
B-flat Contrabass Clarinet
B-flat Soprano Saxophone
E-flat Alto Saxophone I-II
B-flat Tenor Saxophone
E-flat Baritone Saxophone
B-flat Trumpet I-II
Horn in F I-II-III-IV
Trombone I-II-III
Bass Trombone
Euphonium
Tuba
String Bass/Bass Guitar
Guitar
Timpani
Percussion, including:

  • Bells
  • Crash Cymbals
  • Drum Set
  • Tambourine
  • Vibraphone
  • Wood Block


Errata

None discovered thus far.


Program Notes

California Dreamin' is a song written by John Phillips and Michelle Phillips and was first recorded by Barry McGuire. However, the best known version is by The Mamas & the Papas, who sang backup on the original version and released as a single in 1965. The song is #89 in Rolling Stone's list of the 500 Greatest Songs of All Time. The lyrics of the song express the narrator's longing for the warmth of Los Angeles during a cold winter in New York City. The song became a signpost of the California Myth[5] and the arrival of the nascent counterculture era.

Monday, Monday is a 1966 song written by John Phillips and recorded by the Mamas & the Papas using background instruments played by members of The Wrecking Crew for their 1966 album If You Can Believe Your Eyes and Ears. It was the group's only number-one hit on the U.S. Billboard Hot 100.

Phillips said that he wrote the song quickly, in about 20 minutes. The song includes a false ending, when there is a pause before the coda of the song, and goes up a half note for the bridges and refrains of the song.

On March 2, 1967, The Mamas & the Papas won a Grammy Award for Best Pop Performance by a Duo or Group with Vocal for this song.

- Program Note from Wikipedia


Commercial Discography

None discovered thus far.


State Ratings

None discovered thus far.


Performances

To submit a performance please join The Wind Repertory Project


Works for Winds by this Composer


Resources