Please DONATE to help with maintenance and upkeep of the Wind Repertory Project!

Boogie Woogie Bugle Boy

From Wind Repertory Project
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Don Raye

Don Raye and Hughie Prince (arr. James D Ployhar)


This article is a stub. If you can help add information to it,
please join the WRP and visit the FAQ (left sidebar) for information.


Subtitle: Rock novelty featuring the cornet-trumpet section


General Info

Year: 1941 / 1975
Duration: c. 2:45
Difficulty: II (see Ratings for explanation)
Original Medium: Song
Publisher: Alfred Publishing
Cost: Score and Parts (print) - $35.00   |   Score Only (print) - $6.00


Instrumentation

(Needed - please join the WRP if you can help.)


Errata

None discovered thus far.


Program Notes

Boogie Woogie Bugle Boy was a major hit song for The Andrews Sisters and an iconic World War II tune. The song is ranked No. 6 on Songs of the Century. Bette Midler's 1972 recording of the song reached the top ten on the U.S. pop singles chart.

According to the lyrics of the song, a renowned Chicago, Illinois, street musician is drafted into the U.S. Army (presumably during the peacetime draft imposed by the Roosevelt administration). In addition to being famous, the bugler was the "top man at his craft," but the army reduced his musical contributions to blowing the wakeup call (Reveille) in the morning. His not being able to play his usual chops depressed him: "It really brought him down, because he couldn't jam." The Cap (An army captain – the company commander) was sympathetic and assembled a band to keep the bugler company. Back in the saddle again, he infuses his style into reveille: "He blows it eight to the bar...in boogie rhythm." His company is enthusiastic about his style too: "And now the company jumps when he plays reveille." But apparently the bugler can't get it done without his band, "He can't blow a note if the bass and guitar/Isn't with him."

Articles published in Stars & Stripes on 19 March 1943, as well as Billboard Magazine and The Christian Science Monitor during World War II credit Clarence Zylman of Muskegon, Michigan, as the original Boogie Woogie Bugler.

- Program Note from Wikipedia


Commercial Discography

None discovered thus far.


State Ratings

None discovered thus far.


Performances

To submit a performance please join The Wind Repertory Project


Works for Winds by this Composer


Resources