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Benjamin Yusupov

From Wind Repertory Project
Benjamin Yusupov

Biography

Benjamin Yusupov (b. 22 November 1962, Dushanbe, Tajikistan) is an Israeli classical composer, conductor and pianist.

Dr. Yusupov studied piano, composition and conducting at the Tchaikovsky State Conservatory in Moscow with Roman Ledeniov, Yuri Fortunatov and Dmitri Kitajenko. He received his Ph.D. degree at Bar-Ilan University.

Yusupov works closely with outstanding artists as Maxim Vengerov, Mischa Maisky, Vadim Repin, Alexander Kniazev, Maxim Rysanov, Sergei Nakariakov and others.

His extensive catalogue has been performed extensively by a wide range of renowned artists and orchestra across the globe the likes of the London Philharmonic, Munich Philharmonic, Israel Philharmonic, Lucerne Symphony Orchestra, Copenhagen Philharmonic, Orchestre Philharmonique de Radio France, Bogota Philharmonic, New World Symphony, NDR Radio-Philharmonie Hannover, Iceland Symphony Orchestra, Belgrade Philharmonic, to name a few.

In 2005, Yusupov’s Viola Tango Rock Concerto - written for the internationally-renowned violinist Maxim Vengerov – enjoyed a triumphant world-premiere by the NDR Radio-Philharmonie in Hannover. The music has been welcomed with great enthusiasm by audiences and critics around the globe. The work has been featured in a documentary film about the life of Maxim Vengerov titled "Living the Dream" produced by EMI Classics and distributed worldwide.

Yusupov has also written a cello concerto for Mischa Maisky, commemorating the cellist’s 60th birthday and premiered by Mischa Maisky with Lucerne Symphony Orchestra conducted by the author. The piece was commissioned by three major orchestras: Lucerne Symphony Orchestra, London Philharmonic and Israel Philharmonic.

Yusupov was awarded the Clone Prize (1992), the Sherover Award (1993), the Israeli Prime Minister Prizes (1999, 2008), the ACUM Prizes (2002, 2004) the Landau Award for the Performing Arts (2007), and Engel Prize (2009).


Works for Winds


References