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15th Night of the Moon

From Wind Repertory Project
Joel Puckett

Joel Puckett


Subtitle: Concerto for Trumpet and Wind Ensemble


General Info

Year: 2014
Duration: c. 23:25
Difficulty: (see Ratings for explanation)
Publisher: Bill Holab Music
Cost: Score and Parts - Rental


Movements (played without pause)

1. “When people sing … I enter the earth."
2. “When you arrive at god’s place, You make yourself small. You come in small to god’s place. You do what you have to do there.”
3. “Then you return to where everyone is.” [cadenza]
4. “You enter the earth and you return to enter the skin of your body."


Instrumentation

Full Score
Solo Trumpet
Flute I-II-III
Oboe I-II
Bassoon I-II
B-flat Soprano Clarinet I-II-III
B-flat Bass Clarinet
E-flat Alto Saxophone I-II
B-flat Tenor Saxophone
E-flat Baritone Saxophone
B-flat Trumpet I-II-III
Horn in F I-II-III-IV
Trombone I-II-III
Bass Trombone
Euphonium
Tuba
String Bass
Timpani
Percussion (4 players), including:

  • Marimba
  • Suspended Cymbal, large
  • Tam-Tam
  • Tubular Bells
  • Vibraphone (2)


Errata

None discovered thus far.


Program Notes

In 15th Night of the Moon, the soloist journeys deep within to find this transformation. Each movement is a projection of a line of text from the bushman’s description of his experience.

- Program Note by publisher


In the past year, I’ve seen the reality of time begin to close in on some of the people I hold most dear, and as a result I’ve be forced to confront the cyclical nature of life. Joseph Campbell describes an appropriate Bronze Age concept in his lecture, “The Way of Art”:

“Out on the plains on the fifteenth night of the moon, at the time of sunset, looking to the west, you see the sun at a moment just resting right on the horizon. And if you look there to the east, the moon will be in the same position on the eastern horizon … And so this also is part of the mythology of the body: the body going through its inevitable course – the long body [from birth to death].”

In this moment approximately halfway through one’s life, the body and mind are in balance; equal in their prowess. In the Bronze Age myths, this was considered to be around one’s 35th year. Typically in these myths, the protagonist goes through a transformational journey moving from one phase of life to another. They are reborn into, for lack of a better word, adulthood.

In his book, The Way of the Animal Powers, Campbell describes a different transformational journey, this one as told by a !KUNG bushman:

"When people sing ... I enter the earth. I go in at a place like a place where people drink water. I travel a long way, very far. When I emerge, I am already climbing. I'm climbing threads, the threads that lie over there in the south. I climb one and leave it, then I climb another one. Then I leave it and climb another. . . . And when you arrive at God's place, you make yourself small. You have become small. You come in small to God's place. You do what you have to do there. Then you return to where everyone is, and you hide your face. You hide your face so you won't see anything. You come and come and come and finally you enter your body again. All the people who have stayed behind are waiting for you. … You enter, enter the earth, and you return to enter the skin of your body ... Then you begin to sing."

These two excepts strike me as related in that the mystical journey of the bushman seems to be a transformational experience much like the one described in the fifteenth night of the moon stories. An experience of change that provokes a profound realization of both the sadness and hope that come with the realization of a circular life.

In this concerto, cast into four connected movements, our soloist journeys deep within to find this transformation. Each movement is a projection of a line of text from the bushman’s description of his experience.

- Program Note by composer


Commercial Discography

None discovered thus far.


Media


State Ratings

None discovered thus far.


Performances

To submit a performance please join The Wind Repertory Project

  • University of Texas (Austin) Wind Ensemble (Jerry Junkin, conductor; Craig Morris, trumpet) – 25 September 2016
  • University of Miami (Fla.) Frost Wind Ensemble (Robert Carnochan, conductor; Craig Morris, trumpet) – 22 September 2016
  • University of Miami Frost Wind Ensemble (Gary Green, conductor; Craig Morris, trumpet) – 19 November 2014 *Premiere Performance*


Works for Winds by this Composer


Resources